Thursday, May 12, 2016

The Evolution of the Slip (Petticoat, Undershirt, Underskirt, Chemise, Shift)


I'm sort of a fan of the slip, Fashionable Reader. I'll often wear them under my vintage items and they serve double duty on the road as night gowns. Here is a bit of a retrospective on the lowly slip...

Chemise  1876  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Early on, very early, a full coverage long shirt like this could be called a petticoat (yes, see the source of the word? petti _coat_ ?), underskirt (even if it had a top part over torso), undershirt, chemise or shift. Although as language progressed the chemise meant a finer fabric with lace or embroidery, usually worn under a corset, while shift mean simpler without decoration favored by young girls and peasants.

Slip  1900-1908  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Petticoat  1909-1911  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Underskirt  1910s  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Chemise  1920s  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Chemise  1925  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Half Slip  1930-1935  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Slip  1940-1959  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Gail's Favorite 1950s Slip

Retro Rack is also on facebook where I post additional images and fashion thoughts.

You can also visit the following shopping lists: Travel Dork, My Steampunk, My Wardrobe.

2 comments:

  1. I also have a fondness for the slip, camisole and petticoat.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I also have a fondness for the slip, camisole and petticoat.

    ReplyDelete

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